Lot 1004, Canada 1867 letter and cover signed Prime Minister John A Macdonald, sold for C$6,084

Lot 1004, Canada 1867 letter and cover signed Prime Minister John A Macdonald, sold for C$6,084Lot 1004 Canada 1867 Letter and Cover Signed by Prime Minister John A. Macdonald, the letter (and its original cover) was mailed to Henry J. Morgan at the Secretary of State’s Office in Ottawa on NOV.26.1867. The cover has a lovely House of Commons crown shield handstamp in red plus a red “FREE” between horizontal lines and an Ottawa C.W. datestamp, and is endorsed for free postage by John A. Macdonald (his initials). The letter inside reads “Dear Sir, I think you had better be in no hurry about transferring your services from the Secretary of State’s office to the other. Yours faithfully, John A. Macdonald.” The rather intimidating tone of this letter reveals unambiguously that Macdonald had a very high opinion of Morgan’s talents and that he did not want to lose his services. Accompanied by three original relevant documents, one about the Secretary of State’s Office (1873) (two pages), and two written by Morgan in 1875 and 1893, the latter being a form filled by himself describing his government career appointments, salaries, etc. An interesting lot, great for postal historians and historians alike. Estimate $1,000, sold for C$5,200.00 plus 17% buyer’s premium.

Lot 1004, 1879 letter mailed from Montana to Ottawa, important history, sold for C$2,185

Lot 1004, 1879 letter mailed from Montana to Ottawa, important history, sold for C$2,185Lot 1004 1879 letter mailed from Fort Benton, Montana Territory on NOV.28.1879 (purple octagonal star duplex, used for less than one year, ties a 3c Washington stamp) to Henry J. Morgan in Ottawa (DEC.9 receiver). The 4 page letter inside is datelined 5 days earlier “Fort Walsh, 23rd Nov 1879” and was written by Morgan’s brother William, an early constable of the North West Mounted Police (regimental #191), who is describing the difficulties of living and working at Fort Walsh. He writes “I am now on the most dangerous duty chopping wood with another, five miles from the Fort. Of course we carry our rifles revolvers chuck full, but we are just as liable to be shot in the back, as poor Graham was. If you know the boy’s people you can tell them that every man here longs to avenge him – and aim to on the first opportunity…” he goes on “I want to get out of this Fort, for in plain English it is the damndest fraud ever perpetrated on the people of Canada…”. Henry Morgan, upon having received the letter forwarded it to Sir John A. Macdonald writing on the cover “Dear Sir John, Please return when you have read this” and the back of the cover has the reply “Dear Morgan, Thanks – your brother appln came I have got his discharge. (signed) JAMD”. The online Mounted Police database (LAC) reveals that he was discharged on June 17, 1881. Fort Walsh was intended to curb the illegal whiskey trade, protect Canada’s nearby border with the United States, and aid with native policy. It served as the NWMP headquarters from 1878 to 1882. Historically important. Estimate $1,000 sold for C$1,900.00 plus 15% buyer’s premium.