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BNAPS Books Department British Empire Censorship Devices, World War II <em>British Empire Civil Censorship Devices, World War II: Section 7 - Canada & Newfoundland</em>, 2011 by Peter C. Burrows. The previous edition of British Empire Civil Censorship Devices by Chris Miller included other western countries. In this new edition by Peter Burrows the Canada and Newfoundland portion has been separated, revised and expanded. It is essentially an illustrated catalogue of the censorship devices used during WW II. Each marking has a catalogue number and brief description, the size in millimetres, and the colour(s) known. <strong>NB: This non-BNAPS publication is not eligible for members' discount.</strong> Spiral, 160 pp. The listing begins with cachets of the Censorship Division, Censorship Office and Examination Division, as well as Forces and miscellaneous cachets. Earliest and latest known dates of use are sometimes listed, as are censor numbers of particular examiners. Each cachet is illustrated to enable easier identification. Similar treatment is given to labels of the Censorship and Examination Divisions. A separate table indicates the geographic location of censors and examiners by their numbers. Various memoranda and forms are listed and illustrated for easy identification. Memoranda include confidential items released by the Directorate of Censorship. Stationery is also listed. The next section, devoted to cachets and forms used in the examination of POW and internee mail, is followed by a section on the Foreign Exchange Control Board, again itemizing cachets, labels, forms, and postmaster handstamps categorized by the towns and cities where they were known to be used. The final section covers similar material used in Newfoundland and Labrador since it was a separate crown colony until several years after the war. Appendices include excerpts from government documents, a list of censorship personnel that has been reconstructed and therefore lacks some dates, and additional notes on censorship to help collectors to understand how surveillance was conducted. Some covers are shown in black and white and scattered throughout the text. A few are shown in color on the front and back covers of the book. A table indicates relative scarcity using a scale of 1 to 10, where '10' means that the item is worth about forty times the value of a '1'. It is nice to see this section updated and issued separately for the collector of Canada and Newfoundland WW II censored mail. 0 stars, based on 0 reviews 0 5
$25.95

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British Empire Censorship Devices, World War II

CAD $25.95
British Empire Censorship Devices, World War II
British Empire Censorship Devices, World War II

Home / Shop

British Empire Censorship Devices, World War II

CAD $25.95
Stock Number: B4h047-0
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British Empire Civil Censorship Devices, World War II: Section 7 – Canada & Newfoundland, 2011 by Peter C. Burrows. The previous edition of British Empire Civil Censorship Devices by Chris Miller included other western countries. In this new edition by Peter Burrows the Canada and Newfoundland portion has been separated, revised and expanded. It is essentially an illustrated catalogue of the censorship devices used during WW II. Each marking has a catalogue number and brief description, the size in millimetres, and the colour(s) known. NB: This non-BNAPS publication is not eligible for members’ discount. Spiral, 160 pp.

The listing begins with cachets of the Censorship Division, Censorship Office and Examination Division, as well as Forces and miscellaneous cachets. Earliest and latest known dates of use are sometimes listed, as are censor numbers of particular examiners. Each cachet is illustrated to enable easier identification.

Similar treatment is given to labels of the Censorship and Examination Divisions. A separate table indicates the geographic location of censors and examiners by their numbers. Various memoranda and forms are listed and illustrated for easy identification. Memoranda include confidential items released by the Directorate of Censorship. Stationery is also listed.

The next section, devoted to cachets and forms used in the examination of POW and internee mail, is followed by a section on the Foreign Exchange Control Board, again itemizing cachets, labels, forms, and postmaster handstamps categorized by the towns and cities where they were known to be used. The final section covers similar material used in Newfoundland and Labrador since it was a separate crown colony until several years after the war.

Appendices include excerpts from government documents, a list of censorship personnel that has been reconstructed and therefore lacks some dates, and additional notes on censorship to help collectors to understand how surveillance was conducted.

Some covers are shown in black and white and scattered throughout the text. A few are shown in color on the front and back covers of the book. A table indicates relative scarcity using a scale of 1 to 10, where ’10’ means that the item is worth about forty times the value of a ‘1’. It is nice to see this section updated and issued separately for the collector of Canada and Newfoundland WW II censored mail.